Watch Dogs On PS4: See How Different The Final Version Looks From Pre-Release Footage

Watch Dogs original unveil was at E3 2012, where it was revealed in a glorious looking trailer, that was truly worthy to be called a “next-gen” game. Unfortunately, its later gameplay trailers never came close to the original reveal. Since we have got our hands on the final retail version on the PS4, we decided to see how does it compares to the (in)famous original reveals.

E3 2012

E3 2013

Retail

Immediately noticeable from the above comparison is the missing Bokeh depth-of-field effect. While it might have looked like it was overused in the original reveal, it looked pretty good and its absence can be clearly seen in this comparison. The rain drops slowing down in focus mode still seem to be intact, they are just less pronounced in the retail version because of difference in the intensity of weather.

E3 2012

Retail 

We saw a pretty impressive looking traffic crash in the E3 2012 demo. This is actually possible in the final retail version. Ofcourse, the E3 2012 one was scripted and hence looked pretty awesome in comparison to the random traffic crashes that we can conduct in the final version of the game.

E3 2013

Retail

The water effects looked realistic in the E3 2013 demo at Sony’s conference. This was definitely one of the highlights of the demo, when Aiden creates a blackout and then runs away on a boat in water. The effects seems to have been toned down in the final version of the game, as can be seen in the GIF above.

In any case, the scripted nature of the demo made the game look far more impressive, even though the end game still looks pretty damn good.

Watch Dogs is out now on the PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One and PC.

So what do you have to say about this comparison? Let us know in the comments below.

  • Candiedbug

    The ps4 version does have bokeh DoF.

  • Harry Sansom

    With how poorly optimised this game appears to be, at least on PC, I’m glad they look like they do or even a couple Titans would struggle immensely!

  • jacksjus

    Ok we get it. Companies put extra polish on demos only to scale it back come full release. Why because there is a lot more going on than the 3 minutes you saw in the demo. So why keeping going over the same damn thing. Are you trying to encourage others to not buy it or what? Other than buy or no buy I see no point in this article. Let it go and keep your money in your pocket if you don’t like it. I’m enjoying the game so it doesn’t really matter to me or the millions by now that bought it.

    • Arnold Stallone

      Do you realize that:
      -we’re close to 2015
      – next gen consoles are here, and they don’t come free with a doritos pack
      – computers have tons of processing power, latest directx, graphic cards with billions of transistors and shitloads of ram
      – games don’t come free with a happy meal
      – studios like ubisoft have multi billion $ in cash, and can hire the best 1000 designers and coders, to make the BEST game engine ever, in a couple of months, that they could use on dozens different projects in 2015,2017, etc, and those designers could create millions of textures, 3d objects, characters, etc etc, and make some sumptuous graphics
      – current hardware, even consoles, can handle millions of effects, particles, movie-like effects like depth of field, and much much more, and that, on the GPU alone, before even taxing and using the CPU
      back in the days, like 2000, lots of time was needed to display and texture a simple house or building, whereas today, a guy can push a button and have 100 square miles populated with trees, grass, sand, roads, buildings, animals, cars, people, 3 d objects, created in a few seconds, with thousands of different textures, shaders, colors, etc.
      – and much much more stuff…

      That’s why, in 2014, we can’t accept a game that only looks ‘good’, the ai is correct, there are a few effects on the screen, frame rate is solid, and there are almost no jaggies, and the story is nice and the game lasts almost 7 hours.

      Today, with the console power, and even more on computers, games should, or rather, MUST look fantastic, even at 1024*720, the game should look absolutely fantastic, with avatar-like incredible textures, colors, effects, particles, etc., the AI should be 10 times more ‘clever’ than a 2012 game, lighting should be amazing, night an day, to give the game that life-like aspect(instead of just crisp textures at high resolution, but it still looks 3d, instead of looking like a movie or real life), there should be amazing blur/depth of field effects, among hundreds other effects used on movies, with a fantastic story, and not only ‘Steve and mike, 2 american marines will fight in Russia, Pakistan, Serbia and Congo, will kill all those foreigner mercenaries that are threatening the world, will stop the alien invasion, and will free the world from all threats, and once again, America will save the world for the 144th time), the game should have a huge/intense/great/well done weapons-skills-health- whatever upgrade tree, to give the player a true sense of progression, there should be no jaggies at all, and the game should last at least 15-18 solid gameplay hours, without even touching the side missions yet. The polygon count should be extreme, and our main character or close characters/NPCs should benefit from a ultra high level of detail. All the content should be included ON the disc, on day one, instead of being released 70% finished, getting a huge patch that will correct 20% of the bugs, and 7 months later, the game still has unforgivable bugs, like battlefield 4.
      The game should receive new extensions, devs, weapons packs, it whatever content at least 3-4 weeks after release, and NOT day one, like the prothean dlc on mass effect 3.

      But above everything, because, let’s be honest, after a 8yo generation, we upgrade our consoles expecting to have 5-10 times better graphics, and releasing games like dead rising 3 on Xbox one, at 720p and 16-24 fps, with graphics barelly 15-20% better than what the Xbox 360 could make, that should be forbidden.
      People can argue fun, story, etc, is what really matters, and graphics aren’t that important. But graphics ARE important. In 2014, a game can have a 10 Oscar story/script, but if graphics look like a ps1 game, and because these last years, with the full HD LCDs, tablets, smart phones, where people got used to high def graphics, the 10 Oscar story + awful hideous simple graphics and flat empty sceneries, the game will lose 90% of its charm. That’s the truth. That’s why today, graphics are important.oh yes, they really are. When we watch the soldiers/terrorists in counterstrike, back in 2000, and we watch the soldiers in killzone shadow fall, or battlefield 4, or cod ghosts(this last one, they still used the same 10+ years old engine, because Activision only makes 1.5-2 billion $ a year with their call of duty games + dlcs, online passes, seasons passes, extensions, map packs, etc), well, the difference is just huuuuge, and the more the characters and everything become realistic, the more we’re impressed and the more we feel like it’s really humans that we are killing(not that killing those guys are wonderful and exciting). I don’t dare imagining how soldiers will look like, in 2018, on the PS5, with probably 30-50 times more power than a ps4, that isn’t even using 5% of all its potential, gpgpu compute , 64 command lanes, many other custom made components for sony, and AMD drivers that are finished like 20%, and still don’t give access to all the custom design Sony asked AMD to build, and all that with the ICE team, which is a team of Sony genius-level engineers that are developing and optimizing/creating much better tools. When we see the difference between 2007 uncharted 1, and 2011 /13 uncharted 3- the last of us, and that, on an ultra-extremely complex architecture like the Cell/spu’s where only God-like developers could dream of displaying a few triangles on the screen, and we see what devs were able to do with temporary sdks, 4 GB of total ram(8, later,announced during devs 2013), permanent changing specs and SDK/tools, etc etc, and they still managed to make a game like infamous second son, or killzone Shadow fall, with its crazy particles, effects, amazing crisp textures, etc, great online gaming and almost bug free, I can easily say that in 3-4 years, ps4 games, once they use the 64 command lanes and start fully using the gpgpu computing + new crazy tools made with the ice team, we can easily espect games visually 5-10 times better than infamous or killzone shadow fall. It’s going to be amazing.

      So yeah, resolution and graphics are important, I would say, today, with our standards , and with 4k content soon being available on YouTube, TV, etc, people, even non gamers, kids, granmoms , will perfectly be able to distinguish a low resolution dead rising 3 game from a insanely amazing uncharted 4. And of course, they will want good-great graphics, that should be, at least, like an infamous ss/ killzone sf game, or ryse and quantum break on the x1. At least, that. The minimum for everybody.

      Right now, 4k is still rare. But in one year, with 55″ 4k TVs well under 2000$, currently available, and the tons of content in 4k( Sony xperia z2, new Samsung galaxy, etc, soon, YouTube will be flooded by 4k videos, though compressed, but still 4k, nevertheless.). And people will then get used to those visuals and quality, if we show them a dead rising 3 game, or cod ghosts , or any other game at 720p, they will laugh, and the game will look pitiful.

      So, again, graphics are fking important, and with 4k coming, or already there, studios can’t release a game that is graphically ‘strong’, or ‘nice’. It must be a bomb, visually. So yeah, graphics do matter. Oh yeah they do. Sorry for big comment.

      TL ; DR
      Graphics are really important. Much more than what some people want others to believe.

      • Don Tusk

        but… i actually got my ps4 from doritos ;_;

  • HichaM Beta

    stop dreaming now
    we see how much ubisoft disappointed us